Hinduism Today Magazine - Join the Hindu renaissance
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Journalists

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Published: Fri, Feb-22-2008
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Url: https://www.hinduismtoday.com/modules/wfchannel/index.php?index.php?cid=11



Our Staff


Hinduism Today magazine is a global public service to the family of Hindu faiths, produced by a small monastic community based in Hawaii. The small editorial team produces the magazine for the same reasons that other orders run ashrams, free eye-clinics or orphanages--as a selfless service to the world.

Our offices are at:
Kauai's Hindu Monastery
107 Kaholalele Road
Kapaa, HI 96746-9304
USA

Hinduism Today was founded January 5, 1979, by Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami. It is a nonprofit educational activity of Himalayan Academy with the following purposes: 1. To foster Hindu solidarity as a unity in diversity among all sects and lineages; 2. To inform and inspire Hindus worldwide and people interested in Hinduism; 3. To dispel myths, illusions and misinformation about Hinduism; 4. To protect, preserve and promote the sacred Vedas and the Hindu religion; 5. To nurture and monitor the ongoing spiritual Hindu renaissance; 6. To publish a resource for Hindu leaders and educators who promote Sanatana Dharma. Join this seva by sending letters, articles, reports on events and encouraging others to subscribe.

Click here for an in-depth article about Hinduism Today, our major outreach service written by a leading Indian journalist.


The Monastic Editorial Team

  • Founder: Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami (1927-2001)
  • Publisher: Satguru Bodhinatha Veylanswami
  • Editor-in-Chief: Paramacharya Sadasivanathaswami
  • Publisher's Aide: Paramacharya Sivanathaswami
  • Deputy Editor: Acharya Kumarswami
  • Managing Editor: Sannyasin Arumugaswami
  • Production Manager: Sannyasin Brahmanathaswami
  • India Editor: Sadhaka Jayanatha
  • Assistant Editor: Sadhaka Rajanatha
  • Advertising: Sannyasin Kaivalyanathawami

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Our Correspondents
We might say the third of the a-b-c's of good journalism is choosing insightful journalists. Here, we take great pleasure in introducing to you a remarkable team of writers who are guiding, through their contributions to this magazine, the course of Hinduism in the modern world. Their in-depth insights into problems and farsighted suggestions for solutions have made Hinduism Today a vital part of the Hindu home for three decades. The visionary nature and inherent sensitivity of these men, along with our very special women journalists, have inspired leadership far beyond expectations in over 80 nations. We call our entire group of journalists the "renaissance team," as they monitor and guide the global, eternal renewal of the world's oldest faith. These journalists have been with us for many years, and we invite more to join their midst. Of course, there are others who have been and will continue to be instrumental in the Hindu renaissance in various capacities. In our universe they include Kiran Bedi, prison reformist and author; Madhu Kishwar, editor of Manushi magazine; Anita Raj, journalist, dancer and model; Swamini Mayatitananda, writing on sadhana, health and women's issues, late thinker Ram Swarup of New Delhi; astrologer Chakrapani Ullal of California; late artist and author Harish Johari of Haridwar; Vamadeva Shastri, Vedic astrologer, New Mexico; A. Manivel, artist of Chennai; Dr. V. Sodhi who writes on health issues through the lense of ayurveda; and many others. To anyone we have neglected, pardon us for not mentioning you, but you know who you are and how dearly you hold the vision of Hindu Dharma. We honor you and the many more who will volunteer their efforts in the future.

Rajiv Malik, of Delhi, with diplomas in Sales and Marketing Management, has specialized in the sale of textiles in his own showrooms since 1984, and "strayed" into journalism ten years back. He writes, "My association with Hinduism Today has given a new meaning to my life, a new sense of direction and purpose. I had never taken my being a Hindu as something which was of great consequence. While working for Hinduism Today I underwent wonderful and mystical experiences. Especially my visits to various Kumbha Melas had a profound impact on my life and thought process as I sat at the feet of holy men and women. While working on the story on Indian child labor, I came across the heart-rending conditions of Indian children. I realized that Hinduism has the solutions to all the extremely complex problems that face mankind today and therefore Hinduism Today has an extremely challenging role to play in shaping the future. I would like to see Hinduism Today become the voice of downtrodden and weak Hindus who suffer as a silent majority in different parts of the world. It is the job of a magazine like Hinduism Today to convey the eternal message of the Vedas and Puranas--that we are not just these perishable bodies but are a part of the Divine. In fulfilling this, I will act as a humble soldier of the HT team for years, generations and births, till the goal is achieved."

Bashudeb Dhar writes from Dhaka: "I became a member of the Hinduism Today family in 1996. I consider it as a rare honor not only for me, but also for the Hindus of Bangladesh, who have been struggling for decades. I am trying to project their struggle. Bangladesh is constitutionally an Islamic country, but Hindus constitute 12 percent of the 130-million population. From 1941 the Hindus here have faced an uncertain future, with deprivation in all sectors of life. There is a wide communication gap among Hindus throughout the world regarding their religious thinking, culture and tradition. None took initiative to foster Hindu solidarity among all sects and lineages seriously. It is reported that dozens of organizations and institutions are working to this end, but the result is not encouraging. Hinduism Today is an exception in this regard. It is not only a magazine, but an institution working to present Hinduism in its real perspective. This I think will go a long way to unite the followers of Sanatana Dharma all over the world, bridging the communication gaps sincerely."

Freelance journalist Archana Dongre lives with her husband, a computer engineer, in Los Angeles. She has been in the US since the early 1970s. Born in Pune, Maharashtra, schooled in Mumbai and Nagpur, linguistically gifted, she excelled in all other languages and sciences. She earned a degree in education and an M.A. in Sanskrit language and literature. Excelling at broad research pieces, her latest articles In Hinduism Today include Adopting Indian Children (4-94), Tribal Art (2-95), Theosophy (6-95), Home, Sweet Europe (9-95), ISKCON's Second Generation (3-96), and a Day in the Life of India (2-97). She writes, "My vision for the future of Hinduism includes a better place for the Hindu woman. In the Vedas, women are respected for what they are in their own right; for example, Gargi, Lopamudra and Maitreyi. In today's society, despite all the advancements that women have made, they are still looked upon as adjuncts, only as somebody's wife, mother or sister, but not for their own capabilities and talents. Of course, all those relations are important, but a woman's own worth and talents need to be respected, nurtured and cultivated, with encouragement from their fathers, husbands and, later, sons. I strongly feel that Hinduism, if rightly understood, has never been just a blind faith, but a rich, variegated source of such fascinating, appealing sciences, like jnana marga and bhakti marga. In the truest, literal sense of the word Dharma, which signifies 'moral sustenance,' Hinduism has all the potential and power to save humanity. I worked in different fields, took college courses in many diverse subjects, but found that no matter what I did, I came back to writing. I just pray to God to give me strength and long life so I can do something significant for my work and my family so I can make a difference and leave a mark."

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Vrindavanam S. Gopalakrishnan, based in Kerala, has been a professional freelance journalist since 1983. He had the distinction of covering the 1987 Military Coup in Fiji and the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990 for the international media. "I would say my bitter experience abroad meted out to me by the organized religions coupled with my luck to meet His Holiness Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami has transformed me totally. The efforts of Hinduism Today from the West to enlighten those crawling in the darkness of ignorance have drawn me further closer. I offered my humble service to become part of Hinduism Today's endeavor for affirming Sanatana Dharma and recording the modern history of a billion-strong religion now in renaissance. In fact, it had enlightened me as it was happening in a scenario where the Hindu organizations, born and brought up in Hindustan with the basic tenets of Sanatana Dharma (Vedanta philosophy) started disowning their heritage--whereas the sannyasis behind Hinduism Today have exhibited the courage to say "We are Hindus." The attitude and approach of these noble and saintly men could definitely instill confidence and courage in the minds of many Hindus around the world."

Dr. Hari Bansh Jha lives with his wife and three children in Nepal. After serving for 23 years as Professor of Economics at Tribhuvan University, he has turned to writing books, conducting research and serving weaker sections of the society, including women and children. "There is a great freedom within Hinduism. But this is not digestible to alien faiths. So there are deliberate attempts to attack this Hindu way of life. I wish to serve the Hindus who are immersed in problems in Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and other parts of the globe. There is a lot that Hinduism could contribute to the world in its spiritual growth and also for the maintenance of peace on the Earth. If my God allows, I might actively concentrate on some of these core issues through Hinduism Today. To me, Hinduism Today means purity, peace, love and an attempt to develop oneness with Lord Siva. I am part of the Hinduism Today family because I feel that I am able to improve myself day by day, particularly in the spiritual arena."

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Lavina Melwani, who is from New Delhi, writes for publications in the US, India and the Far East. Her family is originally from Sindh. She resides in New York with her husband and two children. Lavina is active in Children's Hope, a charity to assist children in India. Her sensitive touch features social issues and the arts, including New York Loves Ganesha (11-93), Mixed Marriages (3-94), Afghanistan Hindus (6-94), Famous Vegetarians (1-95), The Grand Dame of Kathak (3-95), Women Film Directors (2-95), The Veggie Revolution (12-95), the UN after 50 years (2-96), Sky Is Not the Limit (4-97), 35mm Mega-Memoir (12-97) and Hear Krishna's Flute (11-97). In sharing her vision, Lavina tells us, "I have always loved the way Hinduism allows one to have a close, one-on-one relationship with a very personal God. It is a very loving, elastic and all-embracing religion, and I hope in the years to come these will be the features the world will get to see, rather than the fundamentalism or rigidity espoused by a few." You can read her musings on culture, the arts, cuisine and faith at her blog www.lassiwithlavina.com

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Mangala Prasad Mohanty, born in a devout family in the village Batagaon, near Puri town, lives with his wife and son in Delhi. A seasoned journalist, published throughout India, he speaks on All India Radio, and translates poetic works into English and Oriya. In Puri he has registered a Non-Governmental Organization(NGO) called Society for Environmental Action and Restoration of Cultural Heritage (search). He shares, "The world is full of hunger, disease, poverty, violence and hatred, and the worst crime, that perpetrated in the name of caste, religion and creed. But I believe in Divinity and Grace. I strongly advocate that by positive thinking and action, the world would turn better, positive, a place worth living in peace and prosperity. I believe in the ancient Hindu philosophy, vasudhaiva kutumbakam ('the world is one family'). I adore diversity, love, peace and Hinduism. Since childhood I was fond of visiting temples and meeting saints. The same old habit made it possible for me to meet Sri Gurudeva, founder of Hinduism Today. Little did I know that meeting would lead to a lifetime affair in creativity and spirituality. My lifestyle has undergone tremendous change. I am more compassionate, peaceful, calm and devoted to what I do. I have greater respect towards elders, brahmins, saints and priests. I take an active role in the promotion of our value system and morality. Attaining moksha, liberation, remains the sacred and ultimate goal in life."

Prabha Prabhakar Bhardwaj is a free-lance journalist living with her husband in Kenya. She grew up in Jammu, North India. She left a Masters in economics to get married, 16 years later earned a Bachelors Degree in Journalism in Hyderabad, then moved to Kenya to teach journalism at Nairobi University. She specializes in environment and gender issues and has published many books, among them, Body and Mind, Women and Environment, translated into Spanish, French and English. Prabha was a key member in writing two environmental action plans, one for the Kenyan government and one for the UN. Her contributions to Hinduism Today include: Kenya Temple Moves (9-94), Kenya's Hindu Kids (9-94), Kashmir Pandits (11-94), Hindus Return to Uganda (12-94), The Ganesha Milk Miracle (12-95), Hindus in West Africa and Dressing for Heaven (3-97). In her vision, Prabha Prabhakar is deeply concerned for the future of Hinduism: "I have seen five generations in my own family, from my grandparents to my grand-daughter, and Hinduism is successively getting more diluted with each generation. Hinduism Today has the capability to attract the younger generation in a very pragmatic and rational manner. I plan to reach out to the Hindu youth of today and future generations scattered around the world by coming down to their level. I am researching Hindu rituals from birth to death for a book on that subject to attract the young to our traditional religion. There should also be emphasis on caring for elders so that they are not neglected in their late years, an unfortunate modern trend."

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Choodie Shivaram carries over three decades of rich experience as a freelance journalist and is actively involved with Print, Radio, Visual and New Media. She is an Arts graduate and holds a full law degree. She is also an independent HR consultant specializing in the semiconductor industry. Choodie resides in Bangalore with her husband and two children; her daughter Gayathri is an active freelance journalist too. Her many articles in Hinduism Today since 1995 include Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia (10-95), Crafts by Women (1-96), Kerala's Matriachy (2-96), Ganesha Factory (3-96), a Tobaccoless Village (3-96), Tirupati's Priests (6-96), Madhavacharya's Birthplace (11-96), Joint Families at Risk (1-97), India's Beauty Contest (3-97), a Saint's Self-Willed Death (9-97). Choodie's vision statement: "My involvement with Hinduism Today opened my eyes to the real side of Hinduism. Besides the content of the magazine, during the course of penning articles, I referred to a number of books on varied subjects on Hindu philosophy. I was forced to speak to a number of traditional and modern scholars. I was awe struck by Hinduism's profundity. I feel sad to think of how I squandered an important part of my early life in ignorance. I realize that a whole lifetime is not sufficient to understand the beauty that is Hinduism. We had and have great scholars who have written brilliantly about the religion and commented copiously on innumerable scriptures. My windows of perception and understanding of the religion have just started unfolding. Today I am extremely proud of being a Hindu, and this pride comes not by vanity or by virtue of my birth as a Hindu, but by the better understanding of the religion and its greatness. With me, my family has come under the influence of the true essence of the religion, and this has given a sound grounding of the essence and values of Sanathana Dharma to my children." "

Dr. Virendra Sodhi of Washington state shares with reader's his lifetime of experience in medicine and health, unfolding the mysteries of ayurveda for our readers. Dr. Sodhi holds an M.D. (Ayurveda) from India and a N.D. from Bastyr College of Naturopathic Medicine, USA. He covers all aspects of health and well-being in his articles, and lectures extensively around the US.

An invitation: If you are a talented writer and lover of dharma, please contact our editorial offices. Sannyasin Arumugaswami would love to hear from you, as it is his mission, his vision, to add many more fine souls to our Hinduism Today family!